Superstitions as Cultural Identity Markers in Esther David’s The Man with Enormous Wings and My Father’s Zoo

  • Suresh Kumar Assistant Professor Department of English GC Seraj, Lambathach Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India

Abstract

Superstitions play a crucial role in driving the lives of people all over the world. Every culture does have a particular set of superstitions. Since literature is the reflection of society, writers keep attempting to portray the mindsets of people through fictional as well as non-fictional texts. Popular superstitions in the West like regarding the number thirteen, black cats, and breaking of the mirror as unlucky are some, which prevail. In India too, we have similar superstitions such as putting a spot of soot on a baby’s forehead commonly. Shreds of evidence of superstitious practices can be found even in the earliest human settlements in the later Paleolithic and Neolithic periods. The presence of many things of daily-needs in the graves of those periods confirms the superstitious practices rampant in that society. Even in the highly developed civilization of Indus valley, amulets were used possibly to prevent evil forces. Traces of Superstitions can also be found during the adventurous and courageous Aryan period. Superstition not only controls the minds of the illiterate people but also of the literate ones equally.

How to Cite
KUMAR, Suresh. Superstitions as Cultural Identity Markers in Esther David’s The Man with Enormous Wings and My Father’s Zoo. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 11, p. 12, nov. 2019. ISSN 2582-3574. Available at: <http://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/10115>. Date accessed: 07 dec. 2019. doi: https://doi.org/10.24113/ijellh.v7i11.10115.