This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

CALLING THE ‘LAPSED SOUL’:  A STUDY OF THE REPRESENTATION OF ADULTS IN WILLIAM BLAKE’S SONGS OF INNOCENCE AND OF EXPERIENCE  

 

SUSAN LOBO

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE OF ARTS, SCIENCE AND COMMERCE

MUMBAI

 

Abstract

This paper explores William Blake’s representation of adults, and their relationship with the children in his reputed work, Songs of Innocence and of Experience. The author infers that Blake’s juxtaposition of the two kinds of adults, the benevolent and the harsh, gives credence to his belief that their ability or inability to empathise with little children stems from their own childhood experiences. However, the Songs belie a direct and simplistic correlation between one’s childhood and adulthood: in poems like “The Chimney Sweeper” and “The Little Black Boy”, Blake suggests that if little children can display traits like love and forgiveness despite having no prior experience of them, then the indifferent adults in the collection have no excuse for their behaviour. In addition to parents and guardians, Blake also attacks the church (priests in particular) and the education system for aggravating the misery of children. In a world in which the institutions of the family, the church and the school deny children the right to be free and happy, it is the poet who comes to their rescue in his role as a prophet of sorts, and appeals to the ‘lapsed souls’ to treat children as the divine creatures he believed them to be.

Keywords: Adults, benevolent, harsh, children, ‘poet-prophet’
journal of english

Share
2017-04-04T09:06:19+00:00
Share