Languages Sharing A Sentence - Code-Switching

Authors

  • Nasrullah Mambrol Assistant Professor of English, Government Arts and Science College Nadapuram, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24113/ijellh.v7i12.10229

Abstract

Bilingualism and multilingualism are norms worldwide. People often use two languages within one conversation, often switching between the two within sentences. This does not occur in a random fashion but according to traffic rules. The rules are determined by the difference between concrete and grammatical morphemes as well as social factors. This phenomenon is called code-switching.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Weinreich, Uriel (1995). Languages in Contact. The Hague: Mouton.

Brice, A.; Brice, R. (2009). Language development: Monolingual and bilingual acquisition. Old Tappan, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Genessee, Fred (2000). "Early bilingual language development: one language or two?". In Li Wei (ed.). The Bilingualism Reader. Routledge

Hult, F.M. (2014). Covert bilingualism and symbolic competence: Analytical reflections on negotiating insider/outsider positionality in Swedish speech situations. Applied Linguistics, 35(1), 63-81.

Pahta, Päivi; Skaffari, Janne; Wright, Laura (18 December 2017). Multilingual Practices in Language History: English and Beyond. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. ISBN 9781501504945 - via Google Books.

Downloads

Published

28-12-2019

How to Cite

Mambrol, N. (2019). Languages Sharing A Sentence - Code-Switching. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH, 7(12), 5. https://doi.org/10.24113/ijellh.v7i12.10229