Blue Mountain and Blue Roses: An Exploration of the Feminine Psyche in Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie

Authors

  • Namitha V. S Research Scholar in English, Centre for Post Graduate Studies and Research in English, St. Joseph's College Devagiri, Calicut, Kerala, India.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.24113/ijellh.v9i1.10891

Keywords:

Identity crisis, Psychological aspects, Feminine psyche, Personality type, Reality and fantasy.

Abstract

Tennessee Williams, the remarkably outstanding American dramatist of the 1920s, through his plays, presents a marked concern for the identity crisis a woman faces. He projects the crisis arising out of the conflict between a woman’s own aspirations and the traditional role expectations. The Glass Menagerie (1945) depicts the life of two women- Amanda Wingfield and her daughter Laura Wingfield. Amanda is the typical Southern belle that suffered a reversal of economic and social fortune, who withdraws from reality into fantasy. Her daughter Laura, the physically and emotionally crippled heroine of the play is a self-less character who does not speak as much of others. She is extra-ordinarily sensitive and delicate; and her cripple isolates herself into her own illusory world with her own glass menagerie. This paper is an attempt to close study the women protagonists in this play and to reveal that they are a combination of a particular personality type. Williams seems to be interested in the personal and psychological aspects of his women. This paper tries to analyse the psyche of these women and prove that they seem to be more complex and complicated than portrayed in the work.

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References

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Published

2021-01-28

How to Cite

V. S, N. . (2021). Blue Mountain and Blue Roses: An Exploration of the Feminine Psyche in Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH , 9(1), 192-205. https://doi.org/10.24113/ijellh.v9i1.10891