Attainment of Identity and Belongingness in the Kitchen: A Sacrosanct For Immigrants in Richard C. Morais’ The Hundred-Foot Journey

Authors

  • S. K. Jeya Vidya Shree M. Phil, Research Scholar Holy Cross College, Trichy, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract

Kitchen Space in the immigrant land is a site of oppression as well as comfort for women in the South Asian context. Food acts as a culinary mnemonic and shelter for the displaced individual. Under conditions of displacement, the kitchen serves as a stabiliser that helps in the construction of their identity and a source of resistance to imperial and assimilation pressures. For an immigrant living in a strange and unknown surrounding, the kitchen becomes their comfort, domain and territory of control. Food is the first chief element that is effortlessly relocated and conserved across geographical divides. It becomes a way to assert identity, precisely his/her national identity in an alien sphere. The cultural exposure of the immigrant also presents perspectives into the intricacy of associations between certain positive and minority groups. It also provides templates of cultural experiences, identities and bigotry in the fluctuating situation. This article highlights the role of kitchen space in the life of a displaced individual as a reimbursement who seeks to attain identity and stay connected with the homeland.

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Published

2018-12-10

How to Cite

Shree, S. K. J. V. (2018). Attainment of Identity and Belongingness in the Kitchen: A Sacrosanct For Immigrants in Richard C. Morais’ The Hundred-Foot Journey. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH , 6(12), 11. Retrieved from https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/5831