Social Realism in Bama’s Karukku

Authors

  • Ranjith Kumar. P MA, M.Phil, B.Ed, SET Assistant Professor, Department of English Loyola College Chennai. Tamil Nadu, India

Keywords:

hypocrisy, social realities, Christianity,self-destruction

Abstract

One of the important socio-cultural realities of a society in general, is its hypocrisy; the gap between the expressed ethos and the actual practice. From time immemorial up to the present, it is the reality. No organization is an exception. The so-called religious organizations, with their lofty ideals cannot escape from the clutches of hypocrisy. In this context, Social Realism depicts social realities as they are found, sometimes to the point of self-destruction. The famous Indian (Tamil) writer, Bama takes Social Realism to new heights, in her maiden autobiographical novel, Karukku. This work is considered to be one of the master pieces in Subaltern studies. Bama could not continue her religious life as a nun in the convent; she was forced out of religious life, as she was a Dalit. She has the first hand experience of pain and agony because of her social status. The gory details of her convent experience is not just scandalizing, rather shocking. This paper deals with the difference between projection and the reality. Christianity is often projected as a religion, where there are no Jews or Gentiles, Romans or Greeks. Christianity claims to treat everyone equally and that everyone is equal before God. In reality and in actual practice, this may not always be true. Worse than all, in the name of God and the vows undertaken, people are silenced and made mute spectators. In Bama’s Karukku, the out bursts are authentic and this paper attempts to capture one of the socio-cultural realities of our times.

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Published

2018-12-31

How to Cite

Kumar., R. (2018). Social Realism in Bama’s Karukku. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH , 6(12), 11. Retrieved from https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/6437