The Ambivalent Discourse of History, Home and Loss: Rahul Pandita’s Our Moon Has Blood Clots and Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night

Authors

  • Saleem Jaffer Research Scholar Department of English HNB Garhwal University Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India
  • Prof. Surekha Dangwal HNB Garhwal University Srinagar Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India

Abstract

The present study is an attempt to analyze the ambivalent discourse of history, home and loss of Kashmiris as portrayed in two different narratives carried out in Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night (2009) and Rahul Pandita’s Our Moon Has Blood Clots (2013). These novels are the two powerful memoirs that together forms complete picture of Kashmir under the prolonged conflict. These two works can also be viewed as the contemporary historiographies for bringing fore the untold stories and multifaceted nature and versions of Kashmir conflict. Curfewed Night is a memoir that narrates the trauma and loss that Kashmiris had to go under the prolonged history of violence, oppression, persecution and humiliation. It is an inside account of life of Kashmiri Muslim population living in Kashmir. Quite a similar is Pandita’s Our Moon Has Blood Clots: A Memoir of a Lost Home in Kashmir, which narrates the pain and psychological trauma of Pandits (Hindu population) on the persecution and Exodus from Kashmir. It is the lamentation of love, loss, and longing for his homeland while living a life in exile.

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Published

2019-07-27

How to Cite

Jaffer, S., & Dangwal, P. S. (2019). The Ambivalent Discourse of History, Home and Loss: Rahul Pandita’s Our Moon Has Blood Clots and Basharat Peer’s Curfewed Night. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH, 7(7), 14. Retrieved from https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/9285