Post Colonial Perception in Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John

Authors

  • N. Arul Jothi M. Phil (English) Scholar, PG & Research Dept of English, Sri Vidya Mandir Arts and Science College, Katteri, Uthangarai, Krishnagiri, Tamil Nadu, India

Keywords:

Jamaica Kincaid is one of the best novelists in American-Antiguan writer in the present times. Born in St. Johns, Antigua in 1949. She moved to United States in 1965 to work as an au pair. She published her first article “When I was 17” for Ingénue magazine. At this time she changed her name from Elaine Potter Richardson to Jamaica Kincaid. Her novels mostly autobiographical nature and all of her writings are in some way about her life and her family. Kincaid has described her writings are as very autobiographical. Through her writings Kincaid tells the nature of the family relationships and homesickness. Her most recent books are My Garden (book), Talk Stories a collection of her New Yorker writings and My Favorite Plant, a collection of writing on gardens. She was gardener, novelist, essayist, and gardening writer. Her writing explores colonial discrimination, gender, racism, mother-daughter relationships and nature based themes. Caribbean fiction can be very useful to convey the messages of black people and their sufferings. Here also we discuss the colonial perceptions in Annie John.

Abstract

Jamaica Kincaid is one of the best novelists in American-Antiguan writer in the present times. Born in St. Johns, Antigua in 1949. She moved to United States in 1965 to work as an au pair. She published her first article “When I was 17” for Ingénue magazine. At this time she changed her name from Elaine Potter Richardson to Jamaica Kincaid. Her novels mostly autobiographical nature and all of her writings are in some way about her life and her family. Kincaid has described her writings are as very autobiographical. Through her writings Kincaid tells the nature of the family relationships and homesickness. Her most recent books are My Garden (book), Talk Stories a collection of her New Yorker writings and My Favorite Plant, a collection of writing on gardens. She was gardener, novelist, essayist, and gardening writer. Her writing explores colonial discrimination, gender, racism, mother-daughter relationships and nature based themes. Caribbean fiction can be very useful to convey the messages of black people and their sufferings. Here also we discuss the colonial perceptions in Annie John.

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Published

2019-10-28

How to Cite

Jothi, N. A. (2019). Post Colonial Perception in Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John. SMART MOVES JOURNAL IJELLH, 7(10), 6. Retrieved from https://ijellh.com/OJS/index.php/OJS/article/view/9943